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Why I Don’t Use Xylitol: The Sweetener That’s Not Going to the Dogs!

Why I don’t use Xylitol | The Sweetener That’s Not Going to the Dogs
Bob, retired racing greyhound, snoopervision expert & lead taste tester at La Femme Nikketo.
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Xylitol is a naturally occurring sugar alcohol that has become popular due to its low glycemic index, though not as low as other options. It also doesn’t have any after-taste or have the propensity to crystalize like erythritol. So, on the surface it seems like a great product to use. But I wanted to briefly write about why I don’t use Xylitol as it may be important to you as well.

First, like erythritol, xylitol is a sugar alcohol that’s almost as sweet as sugar. With only a fraction of the calories, it’s sourced from birch or plant fibers and refined into a granulated sweetener. But unlike erythritol, however, it’s prone to causing digestive issues, and for those affected by this, I mean digestive upset, like an OMG what have I done to deserve this kind of intense gut reaction.

Enough said. Also, when used in small amounts, it has a minor impact on blood sugar and insulin levels. However, if you’re using it as the primary sweetener in what you are baking and you (or those consuming it) have issues with insulin resistance, you may find that it will impact your glucose and insulin levels.

But the bottom line for me is that it is absolutely toxic to dogs. Big dogs, small dogs. it doesn't take that much for them to receive a toxic dose.

A tiny amount can kill a dog and the jury is still out if it has a similar impact on cats. What happens is when a dog ingests a product containing xylitol it can cause severe hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), as well as, the sudden onset of liver failure and this can be fatal.

Xylitol is dangerous to dogs
Source: https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/xylitol-sugar-free-sweetener-dangerous-for-dogs

It’s unknown if cats could have the same dangerous reaction. Although, it’s true that cats are less likely to chew on foods that are sweet. Even still, if someone has the rare cat that does, it could be deadly.

If a pet gets xylitol poisoning, they need “fast and aggressive” treatment by a vet. Symptoms develop within 15 to 30 minutes. Symptoms can include many terrible and scary things to witness your beloved furry family member go through.

The late Pistol, retired racing greyhound, buttercream quality control snoopervisor

So, with that, that is why I don’t use Xylitol and why I don’t have any xylitol in my house. While my previous greyhound, Pistol was more discerning. Therefore, he was less likely to eat something off the floor if it fell. My current greyhound Bob, is the opposite. That said, the gentleman though he
was, Pistol loved his buttercream! Now Bob, he would push you completely out of the way with little regard for your ability to stay standing if he sees something has fallen to the floor that he likes.

And he likes pretty much anything except for leafy greens. Moreover, even if it is a leafy green, he would charge at top speed to inspect said green that has fallen on the floor. He needed to be sure, just in case there is something amazing underneath. For instance, items like raw meat, yogurt, whipped cream, even a slice of cucumber could be hiding. I’ve become practiced at moving out of the way, while staying in place with Bob in the house 🙂

Bob the Greyhound eats all the yogurt
Bob, the retired racing greyhound, ensures all yogurt tubs are cleaned before being placed in recycling

Last PSA on the xylitol issue is a reminder to read ingredients. For those that have a nut allergic family member, you already are used to this. So, you know to this anyway. Some sweeteners are combinations of each other, like monk fruit and erythritol. You can also make your own combinations, like my brown sugar recipes. Before you buy one that you are less familiar with, review the ingredients so you know it’s safe for all your family members.

For more information on Xylitol and pets go to https://www.preventivevet.com/xylitol and https://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/uncategorized/xylitol-its-everywhere/ to learn more.

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ABOUT NIKKEY

Nikkey Elizabeth | La Femme Nikketo

Welcome! I'm Nikkey Elizabeth.

Yup, that’s me with my eyes closed while my hubby takes the picture. Totally me. I’m in my happy place doing one of my favourite things: on a hike in the Cape Breton Highlands. 
I started my low-carb journey three years ago, for health reasons, determined to make a Low Carb, High Fat, Keto diet work for me as a lifestyle, without the exercise in deprivation with constant calls to the fun police.
I thought, as someone with a severe peanut/tree nut allergy, I am already a pro at adapting recipes to my nut-free existence, so adapting Keto to also be nut-free is something I can master. Truly, I love both the experimentation and the glee when I hit upon something fabulous and all with no sugar! It’s here where the idea was born for lafemmenikketo.com. I feel like a superhero baker and cook with a whisk in hand, whipping the carbs gone to make fabulous nut-free treats without the sugar. This, to me, is simply joyous. I hope you think so too!

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